Mount McDougall Memorial

mount mcdougall mapOn August 14, 1941 an Avro Anson twin-engined training aircraft from No. 3 Service Flying Training School crashed into the east side of Mount McDougall. Two men died during an instrument flight training exercise when their plane got trapped in by mountains surrounding Canyon Creek. LAC Frederick William Greenfield of Madison, Saskatchewan and Flying Officer Ian Macdonnell Sutherland-Brown of Victoria, B.C. were killed. Another airman, LAC McGruther survived the accident and was rescued by ground forces made up of RCAF personnel and a civilian ground crew. They were part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan that operated a flight training base in Jumpingpound. McGruther later went on to serve in Europe in World War II.

Doug Boyd of #10 Repair Depot assisted in the recovery of the aircraft and wrote, "The CO of the flying school said that the Anson would have to stay in the bush, but our C/O bet him a bottle of scotch that ‘his boys’ could get it out and won. I hope he got a good hangover out of it as it was no picnic getting the wreck down the mountain." The salvagers had to trek thirty miles in from their base camp to reach the site. (from "RCAF at War" by Larry Milberry).

In June, 1990, a memorial was erected on the Powderface Trail in Kananaskis Country. The plaque reads as follows,

"ON AUGUST 14, 1941 AN AVRO ANSON TRAINING AIRCRAFT FROM No. 3 SERVICE FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL CALGARY CRASHED ON MOUNT McDOUGALL, ABOUT 10 KM WEST OF THIS SITE. THE LIVES OF FLYING OFFICER I.M. SUTHERLAND-BROWN AND LEADING AIRCRAFTSMAN F.W. GREENFIELD WERE LOST. LEADING AIRCRAFTSMAN A.M.R. McGRUTHER WAS INJURED BUT SURVIVED THE ACCIDENT. THE DEDICATION CEREMONY WAS HELD NOVEMBER 10, 1989. THIS PLAQUE WAS UNVEILED BY SQUADRON LEADER A.M.R. (SANDY) McGRUTHER".

mt_mcdougallmemorial

The memorial is located about 23 km north along the Powderface Trail road which is at the end of Highway 66. Mt. McDougall is visible from the monument. It was named after Reverend George McDougall and his sons Rev. John and David.

George McDougall was a Methodist missionary who travelled to the Bow Valley to visit the Stoney Indians in 1864. He returned determined to establish a mission at Morley. The McDougalls brought with them twelve head of cattle, eleven cows and a bull, which were the first breeding herd in what is now the ranching country of southwestern Alberta.

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